Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11707/1020
Title: A Descriptive Grammar of Jejara (Para Naga)
Authors: Barkman, Tiffany
Keywords: Jejara - Grammar
Tibeto-Burman Languages
Sino-tibetan Languages
Issue Date: 2014
Publisher: Payap University
Abstract: Jejara (Para Naga) is a Tibeto-Burman language whose speakers live in the Naga Hills of northwest Myanmar. This research is among the very first works published about the language. The linguistic situation in the region itself is also still so little known that any language classifications attempted are done so with disclaimers about the lack of comprehensive information. This thesis , therefore, contributes by beginning to fill in some of the lack of information. This thesis provides linguistic information about Jejara grammar from a basic linguistic theoretical perspective. After a brief overview of the Jejara phonological system and a few morphological processes, a description of the grammar of the language is provided. The grammar sketch covers the main features of Jejara. These are based on a set of texts produced by a native speaker, including personal narratives, role-plays of dialogues and descriptions of events in video clips and pictures. The grammatical description includes a presentation of grammatical categories and discussion on the noun phrase, its linear order and components. The simple clause form is looked at, along with unique forms such as locative and equative clauses. Observations about the verb complex have been laid out and clause types such as non-declarative forms are discussed along with comments on transitivity and causativity. Finally, structures which connect clauses to one another, both coordinating and subordinating, are discussed. Interesting characteristics of the language discovered include the overcounting numeral system which is in use until today. Another remarkable grammatical feature is the multiple functions of reduplication, including reduplication of verbs to vindicate imperfectivity. When the reduplicated forms are found preceding the matrix verb, they express the manner in which that verb is undertaken. When following the matrix, resultant state is indicated. The use of gender particles with in a noun phrase to further specify the head as well as resumptive pronouns which function as the second mention of a referent within a single clause are further unique features of the language. Areas exhibiting obvious need for further research include case marking particles and particles patterning clause-finally. In both cases the fine details of motivation for choosing certain particles over others or even over zero marking are not yet understood.(Para Naga) is a Tibeto-Burman language whose speakers live in the Naga Hills of northwest Myanmar. This research is among the very first works published about the language. The linguistic situation in the region itself is also still so little known that any language classifications attempted are done so with disclaimers about the lack of comprehensive information. This thesis , therefore, contributes by beginning to fill in some of the lack of information. This thesis provides linguistic information about Jejara grammar from a basic linguistic theoretical perspective. After a brief overview of the Jejara phonological system and a few morphological processes, a description of the grammar of the language is provided. The grammar sketch covers the main features of Jejara. These are based on a set of texts produced by a native speaker, including personal narratives, role-plays of dialogues and descriptions of events in video clips and pictures. The grammatical description includes a presentation of grammatical categories and discussion on the noun phrase, its linear order and components. The simple clause form is looked at, along with unique forms such as locative and equative clauses. Observations about the verb complex have been laid out and clause types such as non-declarative forms are discussed along with comments on transitivity and causativity. Finally, structures which connect clauses to one another, both coordinating and subordinating, are discussed. Interesting characteristics of the language discovered include the overcounting numeral system which is in use until today. Another remarkable grammatical feature is the multiple functions of reduplication, including reduplication of verbs to vindicate imperfectivity. When the reduplicated forms are found preceding the matrix verb, they express the manner in which that verb is undertaken. When following the matrix, resultant state is indicated. The use of gender particles with in a noun phrase to further specify the head as well as resumptive pronouns which function as the second mention of a referent within a single clause are further unique features of the language. Areas exhibiting obvious need for further research include case marking particles and particles patterning clause-finally. In both cases the fine details of motivation for choosing certain particles over others or even over zero marking are not yet understood.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11707/1020
Appears in Collections:Grammars (restricted access)

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